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Lucas Greder, Ph.D.

Technology Specialist

Minneapolis, MN
612-638-5734
[email protected]
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Lucas Greder, Ph.D. Photo

Background

Dr. Greder supports patent prosecution in the areas of biotechnology and biological engineering.  In addition, Dr. Greder provides assistance with due diligence, freedom-to-operate, and patent landscape review.

Prior to joining the firm, Dr. Greder earned his Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology at the University of Oxford. As the Oxford-Sir David Weatherall Scholar, Dr. Greder investigated the gene regulatory interactions governing the birth of hematopoietic stem cells during development at single cell resolution. Dr. Greder has also spent time doing target identification, target validation, and in vitro disease modeling in the pharmaceutical industry and helping to run a core facility in academia.

Dr. Greder has technical expertise in the following areas:

  • Gene editing (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9 used for knockouts, knockins, CRISPRa, and CRISPRi)
  • Functional genomics (e.g., whole-genome screening with pooled and arrayed CRISPR/Cas9 libraries)
  • Genomic and transcriptomic profiling (e.g., RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, and ATAC-seq)
  • Bioinformatics (e.g., NGS data analysis)
  • Single cell biology (e.g., sc-qRT-PCR, sc-RNA-seq, single cell multi-omics (DNA/RNA from same cell))
  • Synthetic biology (e.g., designing genetic circuits and synthetic signaling pathways)
  • Molecular biology (e.g., molecular cloning)
  • In vitro disease modelling (e.g., differentiation of human iPSC to various lineages)
  • Gene therapy (e.g., lentiviral, AAV, and adenoviral mediated-delivery)

Education

University of Oxford 2017
Cell and Molecular Biology, Ph.D.


Mitchell Hamline School of Law 2013
cum laude, J.D.
Editor-in-chief, Cybaris®, an Intellectual Property Law Review
Editor, Mitchell Hamline Law Review


University of Minnesota-Duluth 2007
Cell Biology, B.S.

Other Distinctions

Selected presentations

Selected speaker, Keystone Symposium on Hematopoiesis 2017, “Chromatin Accessibility and Expression Profiling of the Endothelial-to-Hematopoietic Transition”

Selected speaker, RUNX Transcription Factors in Development and Disease 2015, Weizmann Institute, Israel, “Profiling the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition”

Select Publications

Greder, L.V., Post, J., Dutton, J.R., Using Oct4:CreER lineage tracing to monitor endogenous Oct4 expression during reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), Methods in Molecular Biology 10, 7651_2016_198 (2016).

Greder, L.V., Gupta, S., Li, S., et al., Analysis of endogenous Oct4 activation during iPS cell reprogramming using an inducible Oct4 lineage label, STEM CELLS 30 (11), 2596-601 (2012).

Co-author on “Microhomologies are prevalent at Cas9-induced larger deletions,” Nucleic Acids Res., pii: gkz459. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkz459 (2019).

Co-author on “Cardiac repair in a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular cells,” Cell Stem Cell, 15(6):750-61 (2014).

Co-author on “Stable insulin-secreting ducts formed by reprogramming of cells in the liver using a three-gene cocktail and a PPAR agonist,” Gene Ther., 21(1):19-27 (2014).

Co-author on “Effective cardiac myocyte differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells requires VEGF,” PLoS One, 8(1):e53764 (2013).

Co-author on “Transgene-free disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes,” Stem Cells Transl. Med., 1(6):451-61 (2012).

Co-author on “Loss of Oct4 expression during the development of murine embryoid bodies,” Dev. Biol., 371(2):170-9 (2012).

Co-author on “In vivo reprogramming of Sox9+ cells in the liver to insulin-secreting ducts,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A., 109(38):15336-41 (2012).

Co-author on “Reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells towards a beta (β) cell character using Pdx1, Ngn3 and MafA,” Biochem J., 442(3):539-50 (2012).

Lucas V. Greder, Note, What Do We Do Now? How the Elimination of the Best Mode Requirement Minimizes Adequate Disclosure and Creates a Potentially Unenforceable Fact Pattern, 3 CYBARIS AN
INTELL. PROP. L. REV. 104 (2012).