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Tranxition, Inc. v. Lenovo Inc.

Representative Claim

1. A method in a computer system for preparing configuration settings for transfer from a source computing system to a target computing system, the method comprising:

providing configuration information about configuration settings on the source computing system, the configuration information including a name and location of each configuration setting;

generating an extraction plan that identifies configuration settings to be extracted from the source computing system, the generating including providing a list of configuration settings known to the source computing system and including identifying active configuration settings out of the provided list of configuration settings to be extracted from the source computing system;

extracting the active configuration settings of the extraction plan from the source computing system, the extracted configuration settings being located using the provided configuration information;

generating a transition plan that identifies configuration settings to be transferred from the source computing system to the target computing system, the generating including providing active configuration settings of the extraction plan and including identifying from the active configuration settings of the extraction plan active configuration settings to be transferred from the source computing system to the target computing; and

for each active configuration setting of the transition plan, retrieving the extracted configuration settings identified as active configuration settings of the transition plan; and

transitioning one or more of the retrieved configuration settings from a format used on the source computing system to a format used on the target computing system.

Posture:

Appeal of Summary Judgment that all claims are ineligible

Abstract Idea: Yes

“[T]he claim is directed to the abstract idea of migration, or transitioning, of settings.”

Something More: No

Though a computer could potentially have dozens, if not hundreds of settings across numerous applications, the claim language only requires one or more configuration settings. It does not provide a maximum number of settings. Further, it is not relevant that a human may perform a task differently from a computer. It is necessarily true that a human might apply an abstract idea in a different manner from a computer. What matters is the application. “Stating an abstract idea while adding the words ‘apply it with a computer’” will TRANXITION, INC. v. LENOVO 8 (UNITED STATES) INC. not render an abstract idea non-abstract. See id. at 2359. There must be more.