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Background

Matthew Knabel, Ph.D. is an associate in the Washington, D.C. office of Fish & Richardson. His practice focuses on patent prosecution and strategy in all fields of life sciences, including antibodies, conjugates, pharmaceutical compositions, peptides, small-molecule drugs, gene sequencing, and plant biotechnology. Dr. Knabel has managed a complex patent docket of hundreds of open cases for a wide variety of clients including pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, universities, and startups. Dr. Knabel has advised and interacted extensively with clients and inventors to evaluate patent portfolio strategies for drafting and prosecuting U.S. and foreign patent applications.

Dr. Knabel earned his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His thesis focused on elucidating the mechanisms of microRNAs that are dysregulated during liver disease. In particular, Dr. Knabel’s work identified two key regulators of fibrosis: miR-214 and miR-29a. His work demonstrated that sustained expression of miR-214 and miR-29a helps treat and prevent liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

Education

The Geroge Washington University Law School 2019
J.D.


The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 2013
Human Genetics & Molecular Biology, Ph.D.


The Johns Hopkins University 2006
Biology, B.A.

Admissions

  • Texas 2019
  • U.S. Patent and Trademark Office 2013

Other Distinctions

Publications 

Knabel, MK et al. “Systemic Delivery of scAAV8-Encoded MiR-29a Ameliorates Hepatic Fibrosis in Carbon Tetrachloride-Treated Mice,” PLoS One; 2015;10(4)

Luo, W, Hu H, Chang R, Zhong J, Knabel, MK et al. “Pyruvate kinase M2 is a PHD3-stimulated coactivator for hypoxia-inducible factor 1,” Cell; 2011;145(5):732-44

Mark AL, Sun Z, Warren DS, Lonze BE, Knabel MK et al., “Stem cell mobilization is lifesaving in an animal model of acute liver failure,” Ann Surg. 2010;252(4):591-6

Lonze BE, Holzer HT, Knabel MK et al. “In vitro and ex vivo delivery of short hairpin RNAs for control of hepatitis C viral transcript expression.” Arch Surg. 2012 Apr;147(4):384-7.