Search Team

Search by Last Name
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Wireless Media Innovations, LLC v. Maher Terminals, LLC

Representative Claim

  1. A computerized system for monitoring and recording location and load status of shipping containers relative to a facility with an associated yard defined by a boundary within which containers are to be monitored by the system, and a controlled entry point to the boundary, the system comprising:

means for recording identification codes of containers which enter the boundary

means for communicating and recording information on movements, location and load status of containers within the boundary in response to movement and changes in location and load status of containers made according to instructions received from the facility,

means for generating reports of recorded information on locations and load status of containers within the boundary, and

means for generating reports on container locations and load status relative to designated docks associated with a facility.

Posture:

Motion to dismiss

Abstract Idea: Yes

“We agree with Defendants that claims of the ‘789 and the ‘291 Patents are directed to the same abstract idea: monitoring locations, movement, and load status of shipping containers within a container-receiving yard, and storing, reporting and communicating this information in various forms through generic computer functions. Plaintiffs arguments that the patent claims are not abstract because they require physical steps and include the use of tangible components is beside the point; the claims merely recite the abstract idea of monitoring the location and load status of containers in a yard. See Alice, 134. S. Ct. 2347, 2358 (2014) (‘The fact that a computer necessarily exist[s] in the physical, rather than purely conceptual, realm .. .is beside the point.’).”

Something More: No

“We conclude that the limitations of the ‘291 and the ‘789 patents do not transform the abstract idea they recite into patent-eligible subject matter because the claims simply instruct the practitioner to implement the abstract idea with routine, conventional activity. Ultramercial II at 715. None of the 5 steps in claim 9 of the ‘789 patent or the 4 steps in claim 32 of the ‘291 patent, viewed “both individually and ‘as an ordered combination,’ “transform the nature of the claim into patent-eligible subject matter. See Alice, 134 S.Ct. at 2355 (quoting Mayo, 132 S.Ct. at 1297, 1298).”