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Fish Cases

Mark Cuban: Litigation Maverick

Litigation

Fish Cases

Mark Cuban: Litigation Maverick

Litigation

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From the early days of Broadcast.com—the Internet company he launched—to his telegenic ownership of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, Mark Cuban has long relied on a core group of our attorneys to defend both his properties and his good name in a wide variety of lawsuits.

"Our attorneys were, at one point, forced to fight off—with only hours to spare— a temporary restraining order that would have shut down Yahoo’s national website entirely."

In-Depth

From the early days of Broadcast.com—the Internet company he launched—to his telegenic ownership of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, Mark Cuban has long relied on a core group of our attorneys to defend both his properties and his good name in a wide variety of lawsuits.

Our long relationship with Mr. Cuban goes back to the time of his sale of Broadcast.com to Yahoo, when both he and Yahoo were sued for $3 billion by a rival internet company claiming theft of their intellectual property. In controversial, heavily contested litigation involving a broad range of complex procedural maneuvers, our attorneys were, at one point, forced to fight off—with only hours to spare—a temporary restraining order that would have shut down Yahoo’s national website entirely. The case took seven years, involved 19 separate judges, and featured a number of individuals on the plaintiffs’ side getting their licenses suspended or being disbarred—some were even jailed. But in the end, all of the plaintiffs’ claims were dismissed on summary judgment. Mr. Cuban and all co-defendants were completely vindicated.

We have continued to work with Mr. Cuban on various occasions, including his recent victory in a civil insider trading case brought by the SEC. At issue was the SEC’s allegation that Mr. Cuban defrauded the CEO of a publicly traded company by obtaining multiple nonpublic information in a telephone call and then immediately selling his stock back. As Mr. Cuban’s lead trial counsel, we challenged every critical element of the SEC’s case—arguing that the information conveyed to Mr. Cuban was publicly available, that he never agreed to keep the information confidential and refrain from trading, and that he did not intentionally deceive the company’s CEO. The jury, after just a few hours of deliberation, agreed with us on all these critical elements in the case. The lopsided victory left the SEC with no chance of a successful appeal, ending a case that had lasted nearly seven years.