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Versata Software, Inc. v. Zoho Corp.

Representative Claim

  1. A method of presenting information on a space-constrained display of a portable device, the method comprising:

associating a first user-specified indication on the display with a user-defined external state, wherein the first indication is a graphical indication;

establishing a user-defined operation for monitoring the user-defined external state;

updating the first indication on the display in accordance with the monitored user-defined external state in response to an information encoding thereof received via a telecommunications network; and

associating a second indication with the user-defined external state, the second indication providing textual description rendered in response to selection, at the portable device, of the first indication.

Posture:

Motion for Summary Judgment.

Abstract Idea: No

In response, Versata argues that at the time the ‘740 Patent was issued, the growth of mobile device usage led to a corresponding increase in the demand for rich information content; however, the “inevitable” space constraints on mobile devices “limit[ed] the richness of information content available to a user.”

The ‘740 Patent, then, had “the specific technical objective of allowing status updates to be displayed more efficiently within the limited display screen of a mobile phone, pager, PDA or similar mobile device.”

Indulging every inference in Versata’s favor, the Court concludes the ‘740 Patent does not embody an impermissibly abstract idea. Therefore, the Court need not determine whether the claims at issue contained an inventive concept sufficient to transform the allegedly abstract idea into patent-eligible subject matter.

Something More: N/A

… the Court concludes the ‘740 Patent does not embody an impermissibly abstract idea. Therefore, the Court need not determine whether the claims at issue contained an inventive concept sufficient to transform the allegedly abstract idea into patent-eligible subject matter.