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Motorola Mobility, LLC. v. Intellectual Ventures I, LLC.

Representative Claim

  1. A software product for use at a user station, the user station including a processor and a storage device, the software product comprising computer executable instructions that, when executed by the processor:

(a) enable a user at the user station to select content from each of a plurality of independent publishers;

(b) effect transport of the selected content from each of the plurality of publishers to the user station over a communications network and, without user intervention,

(c) effect storage of the transported content to the storage device such that the content is retained on the storage device upon shutting down of the user station and/or deactivation of the software product; and

(d) effect presentation of the stored content to the user at the user station with a user interface that is customized to the respective publishers.

Posture:

Final Written Decision.

Abstract Idea: Yes

The claims thus are directed to the idea of distributing content, an idea that was a longstanding commercial practice as Petitioner has illustrated. Even the somewhat narrow characterization of the idea as distribution of electronic content (versus content), was, as the ’464 patent acknowledges, a standing commercial practice (such as via retail stores and direct mail sales).

Something More: No

On this record, the challenged claims add nothing more to the abstract concept than well-understood, routine, conventional activity. Mayo, 132 S. Ct. at 1298. The claimed subject matter does not “improve the functioning of the computer itself,” or “effect an improvement in any other technology or technical field,” as there is no recitation in the claims of improved computer technology or advanced programming techniques.