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Appistry, Inc. v. Amazon.com Inc.

Representative Claim

  1. A system for processing information, the system comprising:

a plurality of networked hive engines, a plurality of the hive engines being grouped into a plurality of territories;

wherein at least one of the hive engines is configured to receive a service request for a processing job, the processing job comprising a plurality of processing tasks for execution by a plurality of hive engines within at least one territory;

wherein a plurality of the hive engines within the at least one territory are configured to perform the processing job in a distributed manner such that the processing tasks of the processing job are distributed to a plurality of hive engines within the at least one territory for execution thereby; and

wherein the plurality of hive engines within the at least one territory that execute the processing tasks are further configured to return state information corresponding to the processing tasks for delivery of a processing result in response to the service request.

Posture:

Defendant’s Motion for Judgment on the Pleadings

Abstract Idea: Yes

“The patents-in-suit recite the abstract idea of distributed processing akin to the military’s command and control system, a longstanding and intuitive practice used by many large hierarchical organizations that value speed, efficiency, reliability, and accountability. The patents describe systems and methods of using a network of multiple actors to efficiently and reliably process information and/or complete a task by breaking down the job into small pieces, each handled by a different actor organized within an internal hierarchy.”

Something More: No

“The Court finds that the claims at issue do no more than simply instruct the practitioner to implement the abstract idea of distributed processing akin to command and control on generic computers, connected through generic networks. The claims’ invocation of computers adds no inventive concept because the functions performed by the computers at each step of the process are well-understood, routine, and purely conventional.”